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Thursday | Technology Track Sessions

 

Welcome to NATWeek: A Virtual Experience!
You can begin to access today’s on-demand content at 9 am MT. Be sure to join the Live Q&A to hear from the presenters and pose your industry questions to the experts.


Today's Schedule

9:00 am - 11:30 am        Sessions

11:30 am - Noon            Break

Noon - 1:00 pm           Live Q&A


On-demand Sessions

Reaching New Depths: Innovations in Technological Site Characterization Tools for Integrated Tunnel Design
Speakers: Erin Sibley, Amanda Wachenfeld, and Nick McCrossan Mott MacDonald, Chicago, Illinois

Traditional methods for capturing and analyzing site characterization data for tunnel projects, such as hand-written field logs and CAD–based subsurface profiles, have remained relatively disconnected from the overall ground model and tunnel structural design. However, recent innovations in digital automation and data collection offer the opportunity for more holistic design, allowing detailed information to be carried through the exploration stage to subsequent project phases. This paper presents state-of-the-art tools for design development, such as a cloud-based field report application, digital data planning and management tools, and 3D geologic modeling software, and how they are utilized for seamless, integrated tunnel design.

About Erin Sibley

Erin Sibley received her Ph.D. in geotechnical engineering before joining Mott MacDonald in Chicago as a Tunnel Engineer. With extensive practical knowledge of geotechnical testing and instrumentation, her experience includes subsurface exploration, site characterization and modeling, as well as geo-structural analysis and design. Dr. Sibley’s expertise is also in liquefaction assessment, seismic hazard analysis, and earthquake engineering.

 

About Amanda Wachenfeld
Amanda Wachenfeld has over four years of experience as a geotechnical and tunneling engineer.  She has worked as a field engineer on a number of large and small subsurface investigations for foundations, HDDs and tunnels throughout the Northeast.  Her responsibilities have included for managing subcontractors and overseeing field activities.  She has also been involved with Mott MacDonald’s tunneling projects as a geotechnical engineer responsible for parameter selection, 3D modeling, investigation design and assessment of ground movements due to tunneling.  She holds a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering with a focus on Geotechnical Engineering from Tufts University.

About Nick McCrossan
Nick McCrossan is a Senior Engineer with over seven years of post-graduate experience with Mott MacDonald. Since leaving the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow in 2012 with a MEng in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nick has worked on a range of major heavy civil and transportation projects in the UK and USA gaining a range of experience including construction site management, design management and integration, and information management and specializes in the detailed technical analysis and design of segmental tunnel linings.

 

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Jacked Pre–Cast Segmental Shaft Construction Methodologies
Speaker: Joe Anderson, Golder, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Traditional methods for capturing and analyzing site characterization data for tunnel projects, such as hand–written field logs and CAD–based subsurface profiles, have remained relatively disconnected from the overall ground model and tunnel structural design. However, recent innovations in digital automation and data collection offer the opportunity for more holistic design, allowing detailed information to be carried through the exploration stage to subsequent project phases. This paper presents state–of–the–art tools for design development, such as a cloud-based field report application, digital data planning and management tools, and 3D geologic modeling software, and how they are utilized for seamless, integrated tunnel design.

Pre–cast segmental methodology can also minimize the need for wet process applications on site and assist in reducing site waste streams due to its predominantly pre–cast system components.

About Joe Anderson, P.E.

Joe is a structural/tunnel engineer at Golder, based in Saskatoon, Canada.

Joe has 10 years’ experience across the mining and tunneling industries  and has been involved in the design and construction of multiple shafts  and tunnel projects in both competent and unstable ground utilizing across  the United Kingdom and North America using NATM/SEM techniques and steel, cast iron and composite lining systems.

 

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TBM Hardening and Anti–wear Mechanisms Against Ground Abrasion
Speaker: Donald Del Nero, Hatch, Clarkesville, Georgia

Soil and rock abrasion can have substantial impacts on TBM productivity and downtime events. The impacts of abrasion must be considered holistically for all TBM types and their individual components; from cutters to the muck scoops, from the plenum to the screw, and from the slurry pumps to the slurry plant. Productivity and downtime events from abrasion often point to metallurgical deficiencies. The paper will therefore highlight metallurgical aspects of abrasion resistance, common TBM wear patterns, customized anti-wear hardening mechanisms, custom steel alloys on the market and on what projects they have been implemented.

About Don Del Nero

Don Del Nero is the Tunnel Director for the United States with Hatch. He holds a minor in geology, BS in Civil Engineering, MS in Geotechnical Engineering, and has 31 years of underground experience. He is also an instructor for the NASTT New Installation Course, Breakthroughs in Tunneling, Microtunneling, and Risk Management in Underground Construction Short-courses and was the Program Chair for the 2018 No–Dig Show.

 

 

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Union Square Market Street Station
Speaker: David Abrahams, WSP, NEW YORK, New York

The Union Square Market Street Station was constructed using top-down, cut and cover excavation methods utilizing 150 foot battered drilled shafts as permanent ground support, rendering it one of the most unique subway station configurations in the world. San Francisco’s Central Subway Project is a 1.7-mile-long subway extension with three underground stations. Its temporary and permanent ground support, compensation grouting activities, excavation dewatering, and existing conditions will be presented. Entrances at the historic Union Square and a second entrance that integrates with an existing BART station will also be described.

About David Abrahams

David Abrahams is a supervising engineer focusing on the design and management of large underground projects.  He has played various roles in a variety of project delivery methods.   He has worked on projects in all phases of development, from preliminary engineering, through detailed design and into construction. He has a diverse experience in the design of underground structures in soft ground and rock, including bored tunnels, caverns, cut-and-cover and shafts.

 

About Kenneth Johnson:

Ken has nearly 40 years of experience in earth science and geological engineering, having worked on issues involving tunnels, deep excavations, hydrogeology, excavation dewatering, landslides and debris flows, on a variety of different projects throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, California, the United States and internationally. Specific Bay Area projects where he has had a lead role include: the design and construction of the Central Subway in San Francisco, California High Speed Rail program, BART to Silicon Valley Phase II, The BART Berkeley Hills Tunnel, and construction dewatering sites around the region.

 

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EPBM Pro–Active Tracking and Progressive Optimization
Speaker: Colin Lavassar, McMillen Jacobs, Washington, D.C.

Current Earth Pressure Balance TBMs (EPBM) are equipped with a multitude of sensors that continuously record operational data. These data feeds can produce an almost overwhelming amount of information, especially when combined with results of geotechnical instrumentation programs that monitor soil and groundwater response to tunneling. Owners, designers and contractors benefit from pro-active analyses and visualization of these data sets though as this enables operational changes to be made in a timely manner to optimize TBM performance. Furthermore, a progressive response is often necessary to efficiently overcome problems that result from a combination of root causes, especially during TBM launch and the infamous “Learning Curve”.  This paper focuses on the lessons learned regarding TBM data analysis and visualization during construction of the Anacostia River Tunnel and how these have been applied to the North East Boundary Tunnel, in Washington DC.

About Colin Lavassar:

Mr. Lavassar is a geotechnical engineer with McMillen Jacobs Associates. He has 12 years of experience in the heavy civil industry working on major underground projects for light rail and CSO control systems. Since 2016, Mr. Lavassar has been working in Washington DC for DC Water’s Clean Rivers program. The Clean River’s program includes 5 major tunnel contracts that will capture combined sewer overflows to the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers, improve water quality and reduce the likelihood of inland flooding in parts of the capital. Mr. Lavassar’s presentation today will discuss lessons learned from the Anacostia River Tunnel project and how these have been applied to subsequent construction efforts that make up the DC Clean River’s program.

 

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Small Diameter Tunnelling: Limitations and Machine Concepts
Speaker: Peter Schmaeh, Herrenknecht AG, Schwanau-Allmannsweier,

Small diameter tunnels are considered for a large variety of applications from water and gravity tunnels for sewage to tunnels for cable and telecommunication lines. Furthermore, challenging crossings of water and traffic ways represent an increasing niche market for small TBMs, including pipeline installations. Especially in the pipeline industry, the tunnel diameter is not defined by the application itself but by the applicable tunnelling method. This creates a demand for small tunnels, even on long distances and difficult ground conditions.

Safety aspects in mechanized tunnelling are becoming increasingly important. Latest safety regulations have tightened requirements regarding machine diameter and accessibility with considerable impact on personal access and logistics. As a result, larger diameters will come more into focus or unmanned procedures like pipe jacking will take over a share of the smaller diameters of up to four meters.

About Peter Schmäh

Peter Schmäh was born in 1968 in Constance, Germany. After his degree in Mechanical Engineering at RWTH Aachen, he started working for Herrenknecht AG in 1998 as a Project Manager, in charge of worldwide Utility Tunneling projects. In 2011, he has become Member of the Executive Board of the Business Unit Utility Tunnelling. In this position he is responsible for sales of tunnelling and shaft sinking equipment, product management and the rental department.

 

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Deep Shaft Sinking Through Limestone, Mudstone, and Halite
Speaker: Seth Pollak, Arup, New York, New York

The Jansen Project is a new potash mine development being undertaken by BHP in Saskatchewan, Canada. The project consists of a pair of shafts which have been sunk to a depth of approximately 1 km. Unlike previous shafts within the province, Jansen was sunk using new technology in the form of Herrenknect’s Shaft Boring Roadheader (SBR) machine. The shaft liner is being constructed via a two-pass method, with the final liner to be constructed from the bottom up. Shaft stability in the sinking condition is ensured through a combination of artificial ground freezing and primary ground support. The focus of this paper is the area of the shaft at a depth of 700m to 900m composed of limestone, mudstone, and halite. This paper covers the characterization, primary ground support design and construction observations made within these zones.

About Seth Pollak

Seth Pollak is an Associate in Arup’s New York office with 14 years of experience in hard rock and soft ground tunneling. He has designed concrete and cast iron tubbing shaft linings for two of the three Shaft Boring Roadheader mined projects worldwide. Seth holds a Master’s degree in Mining and Earth Systems Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines and is both a registered Professional Engineer and Geologist.

 

 

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